• You liked BFD7 now you should join this forum and of course become a club member to see what CCA is all about.
  • Thank you to everyone who registered and showed up for the BIG Fish Deal #7.

Surface scratch repair on aquarium glass.

Devin Gibson

CCA Members
So I read about using the white paste toothpaste with a soft cloth can be used to buff surfaces scratches out ...anybody have any advice or experience with this?
 

iamzrad

Members
The only way you're going to repair scratches on glass is doing it the correct way; machine polish and buff.
 

DiscusnAfricans

President
Staff member
I would think there would be a thread......is this not a common thing in the hobby ?
I've seen threads where people talked about polishing acrylic tanks. I don't think many people try to repair scratches on glass tanks, as they're not always noticeable when the tank is full of water, and deeper scratches would take a lot of work.
 

Devin Gibson

CCA Members
I've seen threads where people talked about polishing acrylic tanks. I don't think many people try to repair scratches on glass tanks, as they're not always noticeable when the tank is full of water, and deeper scratches would take a lot of work.
They are real light scratches that honestly I probably won't see.....but I figured I would do some digging before I set the whole thing up...once it's up I don't plan on going back .
 

xny1989

CCA Members
Staff member
If these are light scratches that you cannot feel with a fingernail, then this is one alternative. Clean the surface using glass or window cleaner (you could even use vinegar or lemon juice and a newspaper), then wipe with kitchen roll. 2. Gently rub in a metal polish like Brasso (or try a whitening, non-gel toothpaste), using small circular motions with a soft cloth.

If the scratches are deeper, then this may be an alternative.
 

Devin Gibson

CCA Members
If these are light scratches that you cannot feel with a fingernail, then this is one alternative. Clean the surface using glass or window cleaner (you could even use vinegar or lemon juice and a newspaper), then wipe with kitchen roll. 2. Gently rub in a metal polish like Brasso (or try a whitening, non-gel toothpaste), using small circular motions with a soft cloth.

If the scratches are deeper, then this may be an alternative.
What about when im done....cleaning the surface without contaminating the aquarium so the fish will be fine
 

Devin Gibson

CCA Members
If these are light scratches that you cannot feel with a fingernail, then this is one alternative. Clean the surface using glass or window cleaner (you could even use vinegar or lemon juice and a newspaper), then wipe with kitchen roll. 2. Gently rub in a metal polish like Brasso (or try a whitening, non-gel toothpaste), using small circular motions with a soft cloth.

If the scratches are deeper, then this may be an alternative.
Not gonna lie I like that gt glass scratch removal kit.
 

mberecz

CCA Members
I've removed glass scratches from a number of tanks, both light and deep. In my experience, deep scratches take a lot of work with several grades of polish and pads with a high speed polisher. On top of that, it takes a lot of time and energy. If they are lighter scratches, then something like the GT glass scratch removal kit should work fine. I've never had any issues with any of the materials causing harm to the fish, because I always rinse multiple times with water and also vinegar.
 

Devin Gibson

CCA Members
I've removed glass scratches from a number of tanks, both light and deep. In my experience, deep scratches take a lot of work with several grades of polish and pads with a high speed polisher. On top of that, it takes a lot of time and energy. If they are lighter scratches, then something like the GT glass scratch removal kit should work fine. I've never had any issues with any of the materials causing harm to the fish, because I always rinse multiple times with water and also vinegar.
So you don't think a Milwaukee hammer drill or regular Milwaukee drill will do the trick? Scratches aren't that bad honestly....all came from sand doing gravel cleanings .
 

Becca

Chairpersons
Staff member
I've removed glass scratches from a number of tanks, both light and deep. In my experience, deep scratches take a lot of work with several grades of polish and pads with a high speed polisher. On top of that, it takes a lot of time and energy. If they are lighter scratches, then something like the GT glass scratch removal kit should work fine. I've never had any issues with any of the materials causing harm to the fish, because I always rinse multiple times with water and also vinegar.
Where oh where was this thread before I put fish in my 92 corner?
 

mberecz

CCA Members
So you don't think a Milwaukee hammer drill or regular Milwaukee drill will do the trick? Scratches aren't that bad honestly....all came from sand doing gravel cleanings .
Yes, that is exactly what I used. I've also used an orbital sander with glass cutting and polishing pads of various grades. You can get all these on Amazon. My next tool purchase for glass will be a duel action polisher used for car detailing. It will give greater and adjustable speeds.
 

mberecz

CCA Members
Where oh where was this thread before I put fish in my 92 corner?
Yes, but then there's times when I get too excited to just set up a new-to-me tank that I don't worry about the scratches. Now I regret it a little every time I see the scratches in my 220, but I am not draining it.
 

Devin Gibson

CCA Members
Yes, that is exactly what I used. I've also used an orbital sander with glass cutting and polishing pads of various grades. You can get all these on Amazon. My next tool purchase for glass will be a duel action polisher used for car detailing. It will give greater and adjustable speeds.
Milwaukee worked well?
 

Devin Gibson

CCA Members
Cool I'll grab the gt kit and hook it to the Milwaukee and hook it up.....worst case scenario im left with a few that I can still see when the tank is empty....most will dissapear when I fill in sure .
 

mberecz

CCA Members
Milwaukee worked well?
Yes, except for the deepest scratches. It seems better for lighter and more dispersed scratches due to the greater rotational speed, while the orbital sander was good for widespread scratches whereby I needed to polish the entire front of an aquarium. I'd expect a professional dual action polisher would combine speed with surface area ability for faster results on deeper scratches. I've not tested that theory yet, but hope to this summer on a tank outside, which reminds me, this process is a bit messy.
 
Top