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planning my first giant tank (filtration help)

Goonie

CCA Members
So my 185 runs 2fx6s an AC 110 and a huge sponge.

In the next year or two I am looking at something much larger in the 500-700 range.

I have 0 back ground with sumps and was wondering is something like a pond filter would work on a tank this size.

The vision would be set it up in a way that I could run the return into something like a PVC aquaponic system on a frame above the tank.

Those pipes would hold some porthos and be full of lava rock, my intent would be for it to act as a secondary filter.

I am not sure how I could make this work with flow rates, but the idea was the primary filter handles ammonia and nitrite and the return would handle nitrates.

I am looking at a foot print between 96x30 and 120x48 baring no major home repairs in the next year lol.

I have also though about trying to do a plywood build out with viewing window reinforced by fiver glass, which would cut costs drastically, but again no experience with it so, kind of afraid to try.

So, would something like this be possible assuming I am counting on some large air stones and powerheads for aeration and flow >?
 

jonclark96

Past CCA President
Staff member
I don't have any personal experience with large tanks, but most that i have seen (either manufactured or DIY) end up using a sump for filtration. I would think that having a closed filter like a pond filter on a tank with that volume would be a pain.
 

Becca

Chairpersons
Staff member
I think you're best off using a sump, honestly. I've dealt with a few sumps and you get what you pay for. Don't cheap out.

We have a "seamless sump" on our 300 gallon set-up. I won't even pretend that we set that b*tch up ourselves. We paid a professional ( JLW JLW ) to do the important parts. It was worth the investment, big time. Our sump has an overflow drain to one of our lower-level floor drains and a line running from our tap. It's set up to do several small water changes a day and provides insurance against floods should the power go out. The sump has covers so that evaporation isn't a huge issue. My only complaint is the freakin' filter sock. It clogs like every 2 days... maybe because my husband overfeeds a bit and the geos dig everything up.
 

IndianaSam

CCA Members
I set up my first tank with a sump not too long ago. Obviously it's not way smaller than what you're thinking, but the concepts are the same. It's actually pretty straightforward to do a sump, if expensive. The maintenance is way better/easier than using a canister too. I bought the tank used and it came with corner overflows, but I would go with a more modern way of getting water to the sump like a coast to coast rear overflow in a BeAn Animal configuration if I was doing this from scratch. Poret foam is a my only filter media and I don't use a filter sock.

 

Goonie

CCA Members
Even with a sump I am wondering if I could pull off the overhead PVC think or maybe a tower on the side above a sump.
What size sump would that tank need.
 

Freakgecko

CCA Members
Even with a sump I am wondering if I could pull off the overhead PVC think or maybe a tower on the side above a sump.
What size sump would that tank need.
The bigger the better typically. I have a buddy that just put a 150 gallon sump on his 260 gallon reef tank (obviously SW is very different t though)
 

Goonie

CCA Members
Size is the issue as I wanted to run another high tank. But this time ild run a lower stand. So fitting a tall sump under it could be tough to plumb
 
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