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Bolivian Rams and ember tetras

CichlidDan

Members
Anyone successfully keep Bolivian Rams with ember tetras or bad idea to keep them together? Or any ideas on a dwarf cichlid that would work with them better?
 

emerald

CCA Members
The Bolivian rams are both males (though they’re generally quite peaceful). A couple few of the ember tetras are looking a little plump, but I haven’t seen other signs to show they’re breeding, at least not yet. I imagine any fry wouldn’t make it long with the rainbows in the tank.
 

CichlidDan

Members
The Bolivian rams are both males (though they’re generally quite peaceful). A couple few of the ember tetras are looking a little plump, but I haven’t seen other signs to show they’re breeding, at least not yet. I imagine any fry wouldn’t make it long with the rainbows in the tank.
I also have a couple embers that look plump but I haven’t seen any fry yet.
 

Becca

Chairpersons
Staff member
Embers, like most egg scatterers will eat eggs. If the tank is really densely planted you might see a little one appear here or there.
 

CichlidDan

Members
Embers, like most egg scatterers will eat eggs. If the tank is really densely planted you might see a little one appear here or there.
The aquarium is moderately planted. I have some moss growing over the intake sponge was hoping they’d use that.
 

Becca

Chairpersons
Staff member
The aquarium is moderately planted. I have some moss growing over the intake sponge was hoping they’d use that.
They might use it, but if it's not a complete forest, they'll easily find their eggs after spawning and eat them. They also tend to eat fry as soon as they start free-swimming. If you really want to spawn them, put the obvious females in another tank full of moss and spoil them with some live/frozen food for a few days, then some males (1-2 more males than females) and leave them overnight. Tetras tend to spawn first thing in the morning, so if you remove the adults an hour or so after the lights come on (you can observe behavior to see if it looks like there's spawning), you'll probably have some eggs left. Then, you just watch and wait. There are ways to do this using mesh over the bottom of a mostly bare tank so you can see if eggs have dropped, too.
 

CichlidDan

Members
They might use it, but if it's not a complete forest, they'll easily find their eggs after spawning and eat them. They also tend to eat fry as soon as they start free-swimming. If you really want to spawn them, put the obvious females in another tank full of moss and spoil them with some live/frozen food for a few days, then some males (1-2 more males than females) and leave them overnight. Tetras tend to spawn first thing in the morning, so if you remove the adults an hour or so after the lights come on (you can observe behavior to see if it looks like there's spawning), you'll probably have some eggs left. Then, you just watch and wait. There are ways to do this using mesh over the bottom of a mostly bare tank so you can see if eggs have dropped, too.
Thanks for in the input. I'll give that a try in a spare 5 gallon I have.
 
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